Kaweco Brass Sport Gel Roller Pen - MOMOQO
Kaweco Brass Sport Gel Roller Pen - MOMOQO
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Kaweco Brass Sport Gel Roller Pen - MOMOQO

Kaweco Brass Sport Gel Roller Pen

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Vendor
Kaweco
Regular price
$118.00
Sale price
$118.00
Regular price
$118.00
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Unit price
per 
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The Kaweco Brass Sport is made from solid brass with a raw finish that will darken and develop a unique patina over time, giving it an antique, vintage feel.

The impressive heavyweight of the Sport series, the BRASS Sport, is turned from first-class brass. The pen is one of the heaviest Kaweco pens. The barrel is manufactured in a complex process to create this stunning piece of German engineering. With daily use it will develop a natural and individual patina.

The chunky octagonal profile gives this pen a presence in the hand, making it a real joy to hold. Features the Kaweco logo in silver-coloured metal on the end of the cap. Large-capacity liquid ink rollerball refill – capless quality. Supplied as black medium tip. Presented in a Kaweco metal tin box.

 

Specification
Brand Kaweco
Product Type Rollerball Pen
Body Material Brass
Diameter - Grip 8.9 mm
Diameter - Max 13.5 mm
Length - Capped 105 mm
Length - Posted 130 mm
Filling Mechanism Parker-style G2 refill


Kaweco Sport

There are only a few writing instruments which have been successful in the market for decades without big changes. One of them is the Kaweco CLASSIC Sport fountain pen. It follows the design of the year 1935. Outstanding because of its unique form and size.

In 1911 something special occurred with the Kaweco Sport. A pocket fountain pen which everyone could carry anywhere. Just 10.5 cm big when closed, and with the cap on top of the barrel it grew to a standard size pen. Small in the pocket and big in the hand: The Kaweco Sport.

Sepp Herberger already appreciated these characteristics. It was with a Kaweco Sport that the former coach of the German national soccer team wrote on a piece of paper his winning tactics which brought the Germans to the world cup in 1954.